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Toulouse Sausage

So as I mentioned, we’re planning to make a cassoulet. One of the main ingredients in cassoulet is Toulouse sauasge. It’s a sausage with garlic and nutmeg. I called around to every gourmet shop and grocery I could think of. It could not be found. So what did we decided to do? Make it. (Can you tell this cassoulet is important to us?)

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As always, a warning. If you don't want to see sausage being made, don't click through.

So I found a recipe for it from Paula Wolfert’s “The Cooking of Southwest France,” again. (Paula is saving the day on this cassoulet thing.) But as I was reading the ingredient list and then the instructions, I noticed an error. (Don’t think I’m some sort of genius; this is what I do for a living.)

I don’t want to repeat the error here for fear you make this sausage wrong, but I will say that I poked around the interent, and eGullet saved the day again. On a thread about charcuterie, she chimes in with a correction.


I'm really sorry about this error.

I've sent the correction to the publisher.

Here is the correct list of meats to be used in the sausage:
4 ounces very lean salt pork without rind, washed to remove surface salt, dried carefully and cubed by hand.
12 ounces pork tenderloin, trimmed of all fat
4 ounces pancetta, at room temperature

So I did that.

12 ounces pork tenderloln:

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4 ounces salt pork:

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And pancetta.

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The rest of the ingredients. Wine, salt, pepper, peppercorns, nutmeg, sugar and garlic:

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You grind that up:

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Let it sit in the fridge overnight.

The next day, you soak some casings in warm water for about half an hour. I didn’t have any ordered, so Greg came up with the brilliant idea of asking Whole Foods to sell me some. After all, they make their own sausage there. They were happy to oblige:

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So we soaked the casings.

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Now I think Greg would prefer that I don’t show you these photos, because of their delicate nature. I was watching this this absoultely amazing instructional video on Toulouse sausage-making and they explained putting the casing on the stuffer like “well, putting on a condom:”

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So you do that. And then you start stuffing.

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Once you have your long tube of sausage, just twist so you get smaller pieces:

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And then, you freeze your sausage, waiting to make your cassoulet:

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Toulouse Sausage
From Puala Wolfert’s “The Cooking of Southwest France”

4 ounces very lean salt pork without rind, washed to remove surface salt, dried carefully and cubed by hand.
12 ounces pork tenderloin, trimmed of all fat
4 ounces pancetta, at room temperature
1/4 cup dry white wine
3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
3/4 teaspoon freshly cracked black peppercorns
1/4 teasppoon freshly grated nutmeg or mace
3/4 teaspoon sugar
1 garlic clove, minced
Hog or sheep casings
2 tablespoons rendered lard or goose fat

One or 2 days in advance, coarsely dice the salt pork, pork tenderloin and pancetta. Toss the salt, ground pepper, peppercorns, nutmeg, sugar and garlic with the cubes and push everything through the coarse plate of a meat grinder. (If you do not have a meat grinder, finely dice the meat and pancetta, chop separately in batches by pulsing in a food processor. Then mix together the chopped meats, white wine and the seasonings.) Cover and refrigerate overnight.

The following day, unravel a few feet of casing. Soak in lukewarm water for 30 minutes. Slip one end of the casing over the faucet nozzle and run cold water through it to rinse. Check that there are no holes in the casing. If you find a hole, sever at that point and tie a knot. Tie nots at one end of each length after washing and draining.

Using a sausage stuffer, push the meat mixture through to fill the casings loosely. If too tight, the skin may burst. Press out all the air pockets. Twist the filled skins at intervalas to shape sausages. Secure with string. Brush with fat. If time allows, refrigerate the sausgese overnight to allow the flavors to mellow.


09:20:00 on 11/15/08 by liz - Category: Recipes

Comments

lbabs wrote:

possibly the funniest photos here ever.

11/28/08 12:16:58

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